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University of Michigan postdoctoral research fellow joins ISE staff

By Carla Nelson

Published: Dec 3, 2021 10:30:00 AM

Acosta-Sojo, pictured with associate professor Mark Schall, accepted the position in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering because she felt it was the right fit for her current goals and interests. Acosta-Sojo, pictured with associate professor Mark Schall, accepted the position in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering because she felt it was the right fit for her current goals and interests.

The Auburn University Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering is proud to welcome Yadrianna Acosta-Sojo as our newest faculty member. Acosta-Sojo is joining the Center for Occupational Safety, Ergonomics, and Injury Prevention (OSEIP) as an assistant professor and is excited to continue her research and teaching at Auburn University.

A native of Puerto Rico, Acosta-Sojo has been a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan since 2020. She earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez in 2013, and a Ph.D. in human factors and ergonomics from the University of Michigan in 2020. She is a recipient of the 2014 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program.

Acosta-Sojo said she first became interested in human factors and ergonomics as an undergraduate student.

“As a part of my undergraduate curriculum, I took ergonomics courses and was exposed to various projects in manufacturing environments that sparked my interest in human factors and ergonomics,” she said. “The opportunity to help others by ensuring and improving workers’ safety and well-being and impacting society interested me in the field.”

Acosta-Sojo’s current research focuses on understanding the human perception of the apparent stiffness of an ankle-powered exoskeleton during walking. She also recently evaluated muscle activation changes when using an ankle-powered exoskeleton during initial exploratory learning.

“My future research objectives include utilizing wearable technologies and methods to (1) understand changes in body awareness and motor control and (2) improve rehabilitation procedures for patients with neurological disorders,” she explained.

She accepted the position in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering because she felt it was the right fit for her current goals and interests. She was also impressed by the supportive environment.

“I believe there are a lot of opportunities for me to grow as a researcher, teacher and mentor while contributing to society,” Acosta-Sojo added. “I am looking forward to collaborating within the OSEIP group and meeting the students.”

Mark Schall, the incoming director of the Center for Occupational Safety, Ergonomics, and Injury Prevention, said he is excited to have Acosta-Sojo join the faculty.

“She impressed our entire department during her interview, and I am confident her research in rehabilitation engineering and human-automation interaction will contribute to our growing research agenda,” Schall said. “I look forward to the new perspective she will bring to our center.”

Media Contact: Carla Nelson, cmn0023@auburn.edu, 334.844.1404

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